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Injured On the Job: Workplace Insurance vs. My Right to Sue

Kanata CA personal injury, family, and real estate law firm

BY: PATRICK SNELLING

This week’s reader asks:

I was injured in a car accident while driving to drop off a package for my employer—I almost never drive as part of my job.  I work in an office as a clerk.  The other driver was charged.  Now I am off work and need physiotherapy.  My doctor says I may have a permanent injury to my back. I have received a Notice from the Workplace Safety Insurance Board (WSIB) requesting that I elect whether or not I want to receive benefits.

Can I sue the other driver and receive benefits?

No. In Ontario injured workers who receive WSIB benefits forego their right to sue on their own behalf.  You may choose to elect not to receive benefits and preserve your right to sue a third party in some limited circumstances.   In Ontario, employees who are insured under the Workplace Safety Insurance Act scheme are not permitted to sue their own employer for injuries sustained while working.  Depending on the nature of your job, you may not be able to sue another worker or employer either.

However, if you are injured in a vehicle collision and the responsible driver is not a worker as defined in the Act then you may elect whether or not you wish to receive WSIB benefits or pursue the at fault driver. That is a complicated decision.

Generally speaking, the more serious the injuries you have sustained the more likely you will be better off foregoing WSIB benefits and pursuing the at fault driver.  However, if there are questions about liability (if you are wholly or partially at fault), or if there is a question about your ability to successfully recover damages in a tort action the WSIB scheme may be the best option for you.

Deciding whether or not to elect to receive WSIB benefits is complicated, and best made with the assistance of a lawyer with experience in such matters.  Experienced lawyers are available to consult with you, often without obligation to you.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This publication is the eighteenth installment of our firm’s Legal Matters series, which answers a reader’s question every week.  If you have a general legal question that you would like to have addressed please send it via email to legalmatters@compellingcounsel.com.

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